Friday, August 6, 2010

New ADHD Study

Posted by Tracy Wainwright at 6:54 AM
I've long been a studier of ADD/ADHD. As a counselor I researched and taught educational classes on ADD/ADHD. One question I asked was, "How come we see so much of it today?" Did everyone really miss it before? Is there something about our culture that makes it stand out more or causes more of it? Is there anything parents can really do to help children cope with it?

The answers to these questions are simple,yet complex. Before I tackle any of them, I will share that even as an educated, employed, successful adult, I tested moderate for ADD. I could tell when I took the test, however, that I would have answered many of the questions very differently when I was younger and would probably have been flagged had I ever been tested. But I give credit to my mom for creating a very structered environment growing up where I was held to certain standards and consequenced when I didn't meet those standards. That strictness drove me crazy as a child, but I can see now it was teaching me the skills I needed to get my inability to attend to one thing at a time (unless I happened to become obsessed with something) under control. I learned how to sit for a long period of time (not still, no I still cannot do that, but to take notes, make notes, or otherwise occupy my body so that it will not jump out of it's seat.)

I also believe that we restrict children's ability to have great amounts of physical activity. Thirty minutes in a seven hour period is no where near enough time for physical activity for young children. While I believe they also need to learn discipline of a structured learning environment, children are full of energy. Even average, non ADD/ADHD children. But, we have them sitting in school for 6 hours, on the bus for 1-1&1/2 hours, and then give them 2-3 hours of homework. Add in a few structured activities, and there's not much free time left. (This is one great benefit I get from homeschooling.)

In addition, there are many environmental things that contribute to the increase. It has been suggested often that our American diet heavy in fats, preservatives, and sugar is a major contributor. One new study backs this up. As I look into being healthier and am learning more about whole/natural food eating, I find more and more articles such as this one.

I'm sharing it because I believe that knowledge is important in making healthy decisions. This is only one way we can learn more that may possibly help us as women and moms.

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/5-foods-linked-to-adhd.html?page=2

0 comments on "New ADHD Study"

Friday, August 6, 2010

New ADHD Study

I've long been a studier of ADD/ADHD. As a counselor I researched and taught educational classes on ADD/ADHD. One question I asked was, "How come we see so much of it today?" Did everyone really miss it before? Is there something about our culture that makes it stand out more or causes more of it? Is there anything parents can really do to help children cope with it?

The answers to these questions are simple,yet complex. Before I tackle any of them, I will share that even as an educated, employed, successful adult, I tested moderate for ADD. I could tell when I took the test, however, that I would have answered many of the questions very differently when I was younger and would probably have been flagged had I ever been tested. But I give credit to my mom for creating a very structered environment growing up where I was held to certain standards and consequenced when I didn't meet those standards. That strictness drove me crazy as a child, but I can see now it was teaching me the skills I needed to get my inability to attend to one thing at a time (unless I happened to become obsessed with something) under control. I learned how to sit for a long period of time (not still, no I still cannot do that, but to take notes, make notes, or otherwise occupy my body so that it will not jump out of it's seat.)

I also believe that we restrict children's ability to have great amounts of physical activity. Thirty minutes in a seven hour period is no where near enough time for physical activity for young children. While I believe they also need to learn discipline of a structured learning environment, children are full of energy. Even average, non ADD/ADHD children. But, we have them sitting in school for 6 hours, on the bus for 1-1&1/2 hours, and then give them 2-3 hours of homework. Add in a few structured activities, and there's not much free time left. (This is one great benefit I get from homeschooling.)

In addition, there are many environmental things that contribute to the increase. It has been suggested often that our American diet heavy in fats, preservatives, and sugar is a major contributor. One new study backs this up. As I look into being healthier and am learning more about whole/natural food eating, I find more and more articles such as this one.

I'm sharing it because I believe that knowledge is important in making healthy decisions. This is only one way we can learn more that may possibly help us as women and moms.

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/5-foods-linked-to-adhd.html?page=2

0 comments:

 

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