Tuesday, April 29, 2008

Tricks of the Mommy Trade

Posted by Tracy Wainwright at 8:36 PM 3 comments
What are your tricks of the trade? How do you get things done? What do you do to maintain balance? Share all your tips and tricks!!

Thursday, April 24, 2008

Verbalizing

Posted by Tracy Wainwright at 2:07 PM 0 comments
The second aspect is verbalizing. Some parents have this technique down very well. As a matter of fact, some have it down so well that their child doesn’t hear them anymore. When children are very young (toddlers, preschoolers) information needs to be repeated. Parents often feel like broken records (a reference our children won’t even get) during this time of parenting. During this phase of parenting parents need to repeat rules again and again because of the developmental capabilities of a child to understand and remember them from day to day (and sometimes minute to minute.) As or children mature they need less repetition. They won’t let you know this, however. They’ll let you say something as many times as you will without actually making them follow through. By the time they are five, however, most children pretty much know what the rules are. They know things like washing their hands after going potty, brushing their teeth before bed, to not hit, to not snatch, and to not interrupt an adult conversation. They may need reminded every once in a while, but they pretty much know the rules.

Friday, April 18, 2008

Modeling

Posted by Tracy Wainwright at 5:14 AM 0 comments
Modeling appropriate behavior shows a child how to do something. When mom gets caught in traffic and decides to use the time to converse with her child or sing some new songs, she teaches her child to be patient in circumstances out of their control. When mom gets hurt and verbalizes her pain without using obscene language, she teaches her child to express him/herself in difficult situations using appropriate words. When someone is rude or mean to mom and she responds with kindness, she teaches her child that we are to treat others as we wish to be treated, not as they treat us. When mom parent goes about her chores cheerfully, or at least not grumpily, she teaches her child that she can choose to be in a good mood even when she’s doing something she doesn’t like to do. When mom talks to dad with respectful tones and words, she teaches her child to respect both of her parents. When mom keeps a commitment even though she’d rather be doing something else, she teaches her child responsibility.
There are countless opportunities mothers have to model appropriate behavior for their children. However, teaching begins with modeling, it does not end with it. Once upon a time good parents who were good people tended to end up with good children. As a counselor I have often seen this not to be the case. When examining this phenomenon I wondered what was missing. These parents modeled good decision making. They were responsible and hard working and kind. But often their children were disrespectful, didn’t value hard work, and were rude. The problem was one or more of the other aspects of teaching character traits were missing from the parenting equation.

Wednesday, April 16, 2008

Intentional Mommying

Posted by Tracy Wainwright at 8:27 PM 0 comments
When we teach our children to go potty, we do it intentionally. When we teach our children to read, we do it intentionally. When we teach our children math, we do it intentionally. When we teach our children to drive, we do it intentionally. When teaching children these types of lessons there tends to be time set aside, specific instructions, often books read to assist in training, and sometimes even other adults are corralled in to help. Although traits such as respect, obedience, taking care of material possessions, patience, responsibility, integrity, and fairness are important, it is often assumed that children will just kind of pick up these traits by osmosis. Most parents understand the importance of modeling in teaching children, but by no means does it end there.
Modeling appropriate behavior is one of five aspects of teaching character traits. This is realized very early on, as children as young as one mimic behavior. It just makes sense that parents need to exhibit behaviors they would like to see in their child. Often a child mimicking the behavior of a parent will bring to their attention that maybe it’s not something they should be doing. Sometimes parents use these opportunities to make positive changes in their own choices. Sometimes parents take on the “do as I say and not as I do” mentality (which, by the way doesn’t even come close to working – it causes a child to see his/her parent as a hypocrite and decreased the child’s respect for the parent.) And sometimes parents just choose to ignore the behavior in their child so that they can continue to ignore the behavior in themselves.

Saturday, April 12, 2008

Random Mommy Tip #2

Posted by Tracy Wainwright at 4:52 PM 0 comments
My children can't pout. They just can't do it. They try, but I've found a trick that won't let them pout. As soon as that bottom lip comes out I get out my imaginary hammer and nails to start building a house. I tell them to hold their lip out because it makes a great foundation for a house. As soon as I start to "build" my house they can't help but laugh. They're used to it now and all I have to do is hold my fingers out like I'm about to start "building." They're distracted before they know it. And I don't have to get on to them or try to convince them to stop pouting.

Do you have any great tricks? I'd love for you to share them!

Wednesday, April 9, 2008

I am...

Posted by Tracy Wainwright at 9:01 PM 3 comments
I am wise. I have been given the gift of God’s wisdom (1 Corinthians 1:30.) The answer to any question I could ever have is at my fingertips. Although I may not always be deemed wise by cultural standards, I have confidence and self-assurance as long as I make God and His Word the standard by which my choices are made.
I am invincible. If my body experiences pain, suffering, or even death, my spirit lives eternally (John 3:36.) God is for me and therefore there is no one who may come against me that has any power in stealing my eternal joy.
I did not pay the price. Jesus paid the price for me (Hebrews 10:10.) My ticket stub of life is marked “paid in full.” My responsibility is not to me, but to Him. I owe Him my life.
I am woman. I am God’s daughter. He has called me to be a wife, mother, daughter, sister, friend, spiritual advisor, and various other roles at different times in my life. Even though I still get bogged down by dirty diapers, runny noses, skinned knees, hungry stomachs, and needy hands, I know that it’s essential to stay focused on Jesus. As a woman, I have a high calling and know that as long as I know who I am in Christ and worshipfully fear the Lord, I will be fulfilled, content, and praised (Proverbs 31:30!)

Tuesday, April 8, 2008

I am not...

Posted by Tracy Wainwright at 12:34 PM 1 comments
I am not independent. I am dependent on God for everything I have and everything that I am. Oh, what a relief! No longer is there the pressure to “do it on my own”. My Father God, who is omniscient, is in charge of my life. He knows what is best for me. I don’t have to guess or try to figure it out. All I have to do is believe, trust, and rely on Him and my path will be made straight (Romans 11:33.)
I don’t have to take care of myself. Now, let’s not get crazy and discontinue personal hygiene habits, good eating, and exercise. God calls us to be responsible for maintaining our health. However, I am able to cast all my cares on Him. I am never alone in my needs. He provides all that I need according to His glorious riches in Christ Jesus (Philippians 4:19.)
Although God may give me a man to walk through life with, I don’t need a man in my life to be complete. I am complete in Christ (Colossians 2:9-10.) I am God’s daughter, He loves me knowing every fault and sin I’ve ever had or will ever have in my life. His Holy Spirit dwells in me and produces fruit in me. My cup runneth over!

Sunday, April 6, 2008

Releasing "I"

Posted by Tracy Wainwright at 9:43 PM 0 comments
As I have grown closer to God I have gradually released these “I” statements. (Okay, sometimes God had to bring me to my knees for me to give up some of them.) But as I have given these ideas up God has replaced them with a firm foundation of who I am in Him. As long as I stay focused on my identity in Christ, I will live a fulfilled, content, joyful life and contribute greatly to the world around me.
I have experienced pain. And God is always present, providing comfort and healing. He has taught me that the pain I’ve experienced is nothing compared to what He experienced as Jesus died on the cross for my sins. Jesus, who chose to die in the most painful of ways, died so that I may receive God’s complete healing. He has also taught me that as long as I fix my eyes on Him, I will persevere and He can be glorified through my pain.
I am strong. I have strength through God my Rock and my Shelter. My flesh will become weak and wear out, but through the power of the Holy Spirit, I will remain strong. As long as I rely on God for strength I will be able to support those people He has placed in my trust and fulfill the duties that he has assigned me. (2 Samuel 22:33)

Tuesday, April 29, 2008

Tricks of the Mommy Trade

What are your tricks of the trade? How do you get things done? What do you do to maintain balance? Share all your tips and tricks!!

Thursday, April 24, 2008

Verbalizing

The second aspect is verbalizing. Some parents have this technique down very well. As a matter of fact, some have it down so well that their child doesn’t hear them anymore. When children are very young (toddlers, preschoolers) information needs to be repeated. Parents often feel like broken records (a reference our children won’t even get) during this time of parenting. During this phase of parenting parents need to repeat rules again and again because of the developmental capabilities of a child to understand and remember them from day to day (and sometimes minute to minute.) As or children mature they need less repetition. They won’t let you know this, however. They’ll let you say something as many times as you will without actually making them follow through. By the time they are five, however, most children pretty much know what the rules are. They know things like washing their hands after going potty, brushing their teeth before bed, to not hit, to not snatch, and to not interrupt an adult conversation. They may need reminded every once in a while, but they pretty much know the rules.

Friday, April 18, 2008

Modeling

Modeling appropriate behavior shows a child how to do something. When mom gets caught in traffic and decides to use the time to converse with her child or sing some new songs, she teaches her child to be patient in circumstances out of their control. When mom gets hurt and verbalizes her pain without using obscene language, she teaches her child to express him/herself in difficult situations using appropriate words. When someone is rude or mean to mom and she responds with kindness, she teaches her child that we are to treat others as we wish to be treated, not as they treat us. When mom parent goes about her chores cheerfully, or at least not grumpily, she teaches her child that she can choose to be in a good mood even when she’s doing something she doesn’t like to do. When mom talks to dad with respectful tones and words, she teaches her child to respect both of her parents. When mom keeps a commitment even though she’d rather be doing something else, she teaches her child responsibility.
There are countless opportunities mothers have to model appropriate behavior for their children. However, teaching begins with modeling, it does not end with it. Once upon a time good parents who were good people tended to end up with good children. As a counselor I have often seen this not to be the case. When examining this phenomenon I wondered what was missing. These parents modeled good decision making. They were responsible and hard working and kind. But often their children were disrespectful, didn’t value hard work, and were rude. The problem was one or more of the other aspects of teaching character traits were missing from the parenting equation.

Wednesday, April 16, 2008

Intentional Mommying

When we teach our children to go potty, we do it intentionally. When we teach our children to read, we do it intentionally. When we teach our children math, we do it intentionally. When we teach our children to drive, we do it intentionally. When teaching children these types of lessons there tends to be time set aside, specific instructions, often books read to assist in training, and sometimes even other adults are corralled in to help. Although traits such as respect, obedience, taking care of material possessions, patience, responsibility, integrity, and fairness are important, it is often assumed that children will just kind of pick up these traits by osmosis. Most parents understand the importance of modeling in teaching children, but by no means does it end there.
Modeling appropriate behavior is one of five aspects of teaching character traits. This is realized very early on, as children as young as one mimic behavior. It just makes sense that parents need to exhibit behaviors they would like to see in their child. Often a child mimicking the behavior of a parent will bring to their attention that maybe it’s not something they should be doing. Sometimes parents use these opportunities to make positive changes in their own choices. Sometimes parents take on the “do as I say and not as I do” mentality (which, by the way doesn’t even come close to working – it causes a child to see his/her parent as a hypocrite and decreased the child’s respect for the parent.) And sometimes parents just choose to ignore the behavior in their child so that they can continue to ignore the behavior in themselves.

Saturday, April 12, 2008

Random Mommy Tip #2

My children can't pout. They just can't do it. They try, but I've found a trick that won't let them pout. As soon as that bottom lip comes out I get out my imaginary hammer and nails to start building a house. I tell them to hold their lip out because it makes a great foundation for a house. As soon as I start to "build" my house they can't help but laugh. They're used to it now and all I have to do is hold my fingers out like I'm about to start "building." They're distracted before they know it. And I don't have to get on to them or try to convince them to stop pouting.

Do you have any great tricks? I'd love for you to share them!

Wednesday, April 9, 2008

I am...

I am wise. I have been given the gift of God’s wisdom (1 Corinthians 1:30.) The answer to any question I could ever have is at my fingertips. Although I may not always be deemed wise by cultural standards, I have confidence and self-assurance as long as I make God and His Word the standard by which my choices are made.
I am invincible. If my body experiences pain, suffering, or even death, my spirit lives eternally (John 3:36.) God is for me and therefore there is no one who may come against me that has any power in stealing my eternal joy.
I did not pay the price. Jesus paid the price for me (Hebrews 10:10.) My ticket stub of life is marked “paid in full.” My responsibility is not to me, but to Him. I owe Him my life.
I am woman. I am God’s daughter. He has called me to be a wife, mother, daughter, sister, friend, spiritual advisor, and various other roles at different times in my life. Even though I still get bogged down by dirty diapers, runny noses, skinned knees, hungry stomachs, and needy hands, I know that it’s essential to stay focused on Jesus. As a woman, I have a high calling and know that as long as I know who I am in Christ and worshipfully fear the Lord, I will be fulfilled, content, and praised (Proverbs 31:30!)

Tuesday, April 8, 2008

I am not...

I am not independent. I am dependent on God for everything I have and everything that I am. Oh, what a relief! No longer is there the pressure to “do it on my own”. My Father God, who is omniscient, is in charge of my life. He knows what is best for me. I don’t have to guess or try to figure it out. All I have to do is believe, trust, and rely on Him and my path will be made straight (Romans 11:33.)
I don’t have to take care of myself. Now, let’s not get crazy and discontinue personal hygiene habits, good eating, and exercise. God calls us to be responsible for maintaining our health. However, I am able to cast all my cares on Him. I am never alone in my needs. He provides all that I need according to His glorious riches in Christ Jesus (Philippians 4:19.)
Although God may give me a man to walk through life with, I don’t need a man in my life to be complete. I am complete in Christ (Colossians 2:9-10.) I am God’s daughter, He loves me knowing every fault and sin I’ve ever had or will ever have in my life. His Holy Spirit dwells in me and produces fruit in me. My cup runneth over!

Sunday, April 6, 2008

Releasing "I"

As I have grown closer to God I have gradually released these “I” statements. (Okay, sometimes God had to bring me to my knees for me to give up some of them.) But as I have given these ideas up God has replaced them with a firm foundation of who I am in Him. As long as I stay focused on my identity in Christ, I will live a fulfilled, content, joyful life and contribute greatly to the world around me.
I have experienced pain. And God is always present, providing comfort and healing. He has taught me that the pain I’ve experienced is nothing compared to what He experienced as Jesus died on the cross for my sins. Jesus, who chose to die in the most painful of ways, died so that I may receive God’s complete healing. He has also taught me that as long as I fix my eyes on Him, I will persevere and He can be glorified through my pain.
I am strong. I have strength through God my Rock and my Shelter. My flesh will become weak and wear out, but through the power of the Holy Spirit, I will remain strong. As long as I rely on God for strength I will be able to support those people He has placed in my trust and fulfill the duties that he has assigned me. (2 Samuel 22:33)
 

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